May 5, 2016

2016 Missouri KIDS COUNT Data Book

2016 Data-book-CoverThe Family & Community Trust (FACT), recently released the 2016 Missouri KIDS COUNT Data Book documenting the status of  children in all 114 Missouri counties and the City of St. Louis.  The annual report is a collaborative project of FACT, the Annie E. Casey FoundationOffice of Social and Economic Data Analysis (OSEDA) -University of Missouri, the Children’s Trust Fund (CTF), and 20 Community Partnerships from across the state.  The book was released during an April 5 press conference at the University of Missouri.

The report provides an annual, state and county-level analysis of
child well-being measuring indicators of Economic Security, Child Protection and Safety, Education and Health.  Data for the report is compiled from more than 80 federal, state, county and municipal sources by OSEDA.

To examine trends over time, Missouri KIDS COUNT compared the most current data (2014) to 2010 baseline data, which revealed that seven outcome measures improved in Missouri during this time period including:  births to teens, unintentional injury, annual high school dropouts, births to mothers without a high school diploma, infant mortality, child deaths and low birth-weight infants.  Outcomes that worsened during the same time period include children under 18 in poverty, child abuse/neglect and family assessments, and children entering/re-entering state custody.

Primary funding for the project is provided by Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Children’s Trust Fund.

2016 Missouri KIDS COUNT Data Book (pdf)

2016 Missouri KIDS COUNT County Pages (pdf)

Child Abuse/Neglect Prevention Month 2016

CAPMflyer2016April is Child Abuse & Neglect Prevention Month here in Missouri and across the country.  This year’s theme focuses on, “Building Community, Building Hope.” Many communities around the state are gearing up for events and activities scheduled throughout the month to emphasize the critical importance of preventing child abuse and neglect and keeping children safe.  Go Blue Day  for Missouri’s kids is scheduled for Friday, April 8.  Please join thousands of Missourians on that day in wearing blue to promote the safety and well being of Missouri’s kids and the importance of child abuse prevention. Prevention begins with each of us – in our homes, neighborhoods, communities, schools, churches and wherever children and families congregate.  To learn how to support meaningful and measurable change in children’s well-being, and how to engage families and communities in the prevention of child maltreatment, please explore the following resources:

Building Community, Building Hope – 2016 Resource Guide

2016ResourceGuide-CoverThe 2016 Prevention Resource Guide – Building Community, Building Hope is now available to download.  The resource guide is produced annually by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau, Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, Child Welfare Information Gateway, and FRIENDS National Resource Center to support community-based child abuse prevention professionals who work to prevent child maltreatment and promote well-being.  The 2016 guide was developed with input from numerous national organizations, federal partners, and parents committed to strengthening families and communities.

Released in preparation for April – National Child Abuse Prevention Month, this guide provides information that anyone can use and share throughout the year including:
– information about the protective factors known to prevent child abuse;
– understanding child maltreatment;
– tools to help build community awareness and support;
– tip sheets for parents in English & Spanish; and
– activity calendars for Child Abuse Prevention Month.

Child Abuse, Neglect Data Released

Child Maltreatment Report 2014HHS’ Administration for Children and Families (ACF) released the 25th edition of the Child Maltreatment Report, which analyzes data collected by state child protective services (CPS) agencies.  The report shows an increase from Fiscal Year 2013 to Fiscal Year 2014 in four key metrics:  referrals to CPS agencies (3.7 percent); referrals screened-in (2.3 percent); children who received an investigation or alternative response (2.0 percent); and children determined to be victims of child abuse or neglect (2.9 percent).

More than half of the states reported increases in child abuse and neglect victims; however, the largest increases were attributable to just a handful of states.  Eight states had an increase in victimizations of 15 percent or more; similar patterns exist for the increases seen in referrals and children that are screened.

When states submit their data, they also are afforded the opportunity to submit commentary that may provide context to the data published in the report.  The states’ commentaries suggest that policy changes related to intake, screening and investigations as well as increased public awareness are factors affecting the reporting of child abuse and neglect.

Prior to the release of the report, Rafael López, commissioner of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families, reached out to the child welfare leaders of states with the largest changes in numbers of referrals or reported victimizations. “We wanted to hear directly from state child welfare leaders about what was happening on the ground and better understand the factors contributing to these numbers,” said López.  “The states confirmed the information submitted in their commentaries.  The states also pointed to the co-occurrence of substance abuse, mental health issues and domestic violence as factors that are contributing to increases in victimizations.”

“We need to shift our focus to the front end prevention of child abuse and neglect and make sure that families get the help they need when they need it.  We are receiving information from states and our grantees that will help us to identify and address co-occurring risk factors so children can thrive in loving, safe environments free of abuse and neglect,” said López.

The Administration on Children, Youth and Families (part of HHS’ ACF) is currently working with states to address parent drug use, mental health and domestic violence connected to the increases.

(Content of this post is from a public release dated January 25, 2016 from the Administration For Children and Families)

View Child Maltreatment 2014 by chapter

CFRP Annual Report: Preventing Child Deaths in Missouri

2014-child-fatality-review-program-annual-reportThe Missouri Child Fatality Review Program’s (CFRP) 2014 Annual Report – Preventing Child Deaths in Missouri is now available. The report provides a statistical breakdown of child injuries and deaths both accidental and non-accidental by county and statewide.  It also contains helpful recommendations for keeping children safe and reducing the chances for injuries and/or fatalities from occurring.  Issued by the State Technical Assistance Team (STAT), Missouri Department of Social Services (DSS), the report provides information about Missouri’s Child Fatality Review Program and reflects the work of many dedicated professionals throughout the state who strive to improve and protect the lives of Missouri’s youngest citizens.  In 2014, 951 child fatalities were reported to the Missouri Child Fatality Review Program – a decrease of 28 deaths from 2013. This number includes children that died in Missouri, regardless of their state of residence or state in which the illness, injury or event occurred. (reference p. 6 of report).    Since 2002, the annual total of overall child deaths in Missouri has been reduced.

CFRP 2014 Annual Report
CFRP 2014 Annual Report Executive Summary
CFRP previous reports can be accessed here.

CTF Grant Funds Available

CTF LogoThe Children’s Trust Fund (CTF) has released its grant application packet for the prevention of child abuse/neglect for Fiscal Year 2017 (July 1, 2016 – June 30, 2017).  CTF anticipates approximately $400,000 available for new (first year) projects.

As Missouri’s Foundation for Child Abuse Prevention, CTF provides grants to community-based agencies and organizations throughout the state that focus on strengthening families and preventing child abuse and neglect by investing in and supporting children and their families. As part of the proposal, applicants must describe how they will incorporate the five protective factors known to prevent or reduce child abuse into their program. The protective factors that strengthen families include building parental resilience, social connections, knowledge of parenting and child development, concrete support in times of need, and children’s social and emotional development.

An informational meeting regarding the application will be held Friday, January 22, 2016, 10 am – Noon in Room 850 of the Truman Office Building, 301 W. High St., Jefferson City.  The meeting is open to anyone interested in learning more about the grant program and application process.  Registration is not required.

Download Presentation – FY 17 Grant Application Meeting 1-22-16

To be considered, applications must be postmarked by Friday, March 11, 2016.  Grant award recipients will be announced after the CTF Board meeting on June 1, 2016.  For questions regarding the General Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Grant application and process, please email CTF Program Coordinator Laura Malzner.

CTF Grant Application Packet FY2017 (Word)

CTF Grant Application Packet FY2017 (PDF)

Teaching Children About Gun Safety

Eddie Eagle

Eddie Eagle

In recognition of June being designated as National Safety Month by the National Safety Council, please see the following links related to Gun Safety.  CTF strongly encourages the use of the safety tips offered & other information to help make sure parents, families & kids know the importance of gun safety.

National Child Safety Council – Safety 4 Kids
National Child Safety Council – Gun Safety
Eddie Eagle GunSafe
National Rifle Association – Gun Safety
Project ChildSafe
Project ChildSafe – Safe Storage
National Shooting Sports Foundation – Safety
Kids Health
Safe Kids Worldwide – Gun Safety
Safe Kids Worldwide – Gun Safety PDF

2015 Prevention Resource Guide

resourceguide2015The 2015 Prevention Resource Guide – Making Meaningful Connections is now available to download.  The resource guide is produced annually by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Children’s Bureau, Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, Child Welfare Information Gateway, and FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention. The 2015 guide was developed with input from numerous national organizations, Federal partners, and parents committed to strengthening families and communities.

Released in preparation for April – National Child Abuse Prevention Month, this guide provides information that anyone can use and share throughout the year including:
– information about the protective factors known to prevent child abuse;
– child maltreatment statistics;
– resources to inform providers on human trafficking;
– tools to help build community awareness and support;
– tip sheets for parents in English & Spanish; and
– activity calendars for Child Abuse Prevention Month.

CAPM2015_flierGo Blue Day for Missouri’s Kids – April 10
Additionally, please use the Child Abuse Prevention Month poster to promote April, and specifically Go Blue Day on Friday, April 10. We encourage you to join thousands of Missourians on that day in wearing blue to show your support for Missouri’s kids and the importance of preventing child maltreatment.

Child Abuse & Neglect Prevention Month 2015

CAPM2015_flierApril is Child Abuse & Neglect Prevention Month nationally and here in Missouri.  This year’s theme focuses on “Making Meaningful Connections.” Many communities around the state are gearing up for events and activities scheduled throughout the month to emphasize the critical importance of preventing child abuse and neglect and keeping children safe.   One of many events is Go Blue Day for Missouri’s kids scheduled for Friday, April 10.  We hope you will join us along with thousands of Missourians on that day in wearing blue to promote the safety and well being of Missouri’s kids and the importance of child abuse prevention.  To help you plan for Child Abuse Prevention Month you can:

PODCAST: The Importance of Parent Leadership

sam blue1February is National Parent Leadership Month. For this podcast we talk about the importance of parent involvement and leadership in communities with Sam Blue, Community Engagement Specialist for the Vision for Children at Risk through Project LAUNCH in St. Louis. Blue is also a member of the FRIENDS National Parent Advisory Council for Community Based Child Abuse Prevention. In addition to his professional accomplishments, Blue is a husband of 23 years and father of 9 children, seven daughters and two sons.

Listen to Parent Leadership Podcast